Tagged ‘Critical Care’

Cases

C3 – Critical Care Case (September)

Tags: Leave a Comment

Nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain
Read More

Core

Ventricular Assist Devices

Filed Under: Tags: , , , Leave a Comment

An overview of how to manage emergencies related to ventricular assist devices.
Read More

Journal Review

Apneic Oxygenation Reduces Hypoxemia During Endotracheal Intubation in the Pediatric Emergency Department

Filed Under: Tags: , , July 5th, 2019 Leave a Comment

Oxygenation is particularly important in children undergoing endotracheal intubation. They have higher oxygen consumption than adults and become hypoxemic more quickly with rapid sequence intubation. Apneic oxygenation (AO) is the process of providing a high flow rate of oxygen through a standard nasal cannula prior to endotracheal intubation (ETI) without bag-valve mask ventilation.
Read More

Journal Review

Levetiracetam versus Phenytoin for Second-Line Treatment of Convulsive Status Epilepticus in Children (ConSEPT): An Open-Label, Multicentre, Randomised Trial

Filed Under: Tags: , , June 21st, 2019 Leave a Comment

Status epilepticus is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Benzodiazepines are recommended as first line agents but their efficacy is approximately 50%. The most commonly recommended 2nd line agents are Phenytoin and Fosphenytoin.
Read More

Journal Review

Accuracy of the Age-Adjusted Quick SOFA Score in Children

Filed Under: Tags: , , , February 20th, 2019 Leave a Comment

The sepsis 3 guidelines recommended the use of the Sepsis Related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score for early identification of sepsis in adults (Singer 2016, PMID: 26903338). An abbreviated version of SOFA (Quick SOFA or qSOFA) includes variables available at the bedside in the ED (systolic BP,
Read More

Journal Review

Delayed Fluid Resuscitation for Hypotensive Patients with Penetrating Torso Injuries

Filed Under: Tags: , , February 6th, 2019 Leave a Comment

Prior to this study, the preoperative approach to hypotensive patients with trauma included prompt intravenous infusion of isotonic fluids – the rationale being to sustain tissue perfusion and vital organ function while diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were underway.
Read More

Journal Review

Balanced Solutions vs 0.9% Saline in Critical Care (SMART)

Filed Under: Tags: , , , , , May 24th, 2018 Leave a Comment

Although 0.9% sodium chloride (“normal” saline) is traditionally the most commonly used intravenous fluid, it is unclear if “normal” saline is the best fluid. Data from prior studies suggests 0.9% saline use may result in hyperchloremic acidosis.
Read More