Med Student Blog

Jul272018

Paramedic Experience

Tyler Prince, MS I U of Vermont Med School 3 Comments Med Student Blog

For most of this site’s readers, first year of med school is well in the past. You’ve moved on from the monotony of books and PowerPoints to the revelation of actual cases. You see the subtle connections between text and reality, develop pattern recognition, and learn how medicine actually works. If you entered medical school expecting to heal the world, your perspective these days is probably a bit more cynical. But no matter how distant those pre-clinical years may seem, you have an absolutely massive bank of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology knowledge. You worked hard to get where you are, and you’re a better healthcare provider for it.

Then there are those of us who come to med school not from college, but from other medical fields: often nursing and EMS. In our prior careers, we skipped the basic science of the pre-clinical years and…just kinda started doin’ stuff.
Read More

Apr062018

Who Are You?

Sanjay Mohan, MD One Comment Med Student Blog

“Code Blue in the waiting room!”

As my co-resident, attending, and I sprinted down the hall, I vividly remember thinking to myself that I probably shouldn’t be here right now. I was working upstairs in the surgical ICU. On a particularly slow overnight, I decided to head down to the ED to visit some friends.

Seconds later, my attending was riding the stretcher (which is never a good prognostic sign in my humble opinion) placing the patient in the recovery position as my co-resident and I were wheeling as fast as we could into one of the resuscitation bays. In the waiting room, we had met an elderly lady sitting in a pool of blood, without any clear mental status who subsequently began to vomit.

“Max, prep for intubation” my attending roared as nursing began to get vitals and place the patient on the monitor.
Read More

Sep122017

MDCalc Fellowship Program

Anand Swaminathan, MD Leave a Comment Med Student Blog Tags:

The MDCalc Fellows program is a 2-year longitudinal engagement for residents and medical students passionate about EBM and knowledge translation. 
Read More

Jul012016

Thoughts to EM Graduates 2016 – Dr. Goldfrank

Lewis Goldfrank, MD 3 Comments Med Student Blog Tags:

On Monday, June 20th, Dr. Goldfrank delivered his graduation remarks to the 22nd graduating class from the NYU/Bellevue EM Residency program. As graduation always is, it was an emotional night. Dr. Goldfrank’s words resonated deeply with all of the residents and their families. Below are his thoughts:

I learned that
Read More

Jun242016

The Case for Outpatient Alcohol Detoxification

Brian Lin, MD Leave a Comment Med Student Blog Tags: ,

Editor: Christie Lech

Background: 

The prevalence of adult alcohol abuse and dependence in the United States ranges from 7% to 16% (Muncie 2013). There are an estimated 500,000 cases of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) requiring pharmacologic intervention every year (Hoffman 2015).  In addition, alcoholism has a large economic burden with annual health related costs estimated to be over $220 billion (Bouchery 2006).

Emergency providers (EPs) are frequently faced with the difficult decision of whether or not to discharge home or provide these patients with inpatient detoxification, even though studies have demonstrated short length of stays and high against medical advice (AMA) discharge rates among this patient group (Stephens 2014). Outpatient alcohol detoxification programs are common however their structures and coordination with emergency departments (EDs) are highly variable. In fact, very few EDs can provide direct referral to an outpatient program. In today’s emergency medicine practice is outpatient detoxification a viable option in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal?
Read More

Apr012016

Staying Home

Sanjay Mohan, MD 3 Comments Med Student Blog Tags:

Like many other young professionals in Manhattan, I grew up out in the suburbs on Long Island hoping to one day make it to the big city.  As I maneuvered through the maze of my adolescence, I vividly remember being mesmerized by the bright lights and the unrelenting energy of the concrete jungle; it was where I needed to be.

For a very long time, Emergency Medicine was the only type of medicine I knew. I would spend countless hours volunteering (read: hanging out) in the ED – all the attendings, nurses, and ancillary staff knew my name and looked after me. I quickly became fond of my EM family.

Before departing for college, when I first discussed my intentions to pursue a career in medicine with my father, he spoke fondly of a place called Bellevue and a man named Dr. Goldfrank. Though I was only eighteen years old and didn’t quite grasp what my father was telling me,
Read More

Dec222015

On the Trail – An MS IV’s Perspective on Residency Interviews

Sanjay Mohan, MD Leave a Comment Med Student Blog Tags:

Program Director – “So what are you looking for in a residency program?” Interviewee – “Well let’s begin by discussing the lunch spread during Wednesday conference.” NOTE: do not say this during your actual interview.

Having completed about half my interviews at this point, I still struggle when program directors ask me this question. And not because I don’t know how to respond but because I don’t know what they expect. I, along with my MS4 peers, am on the cusp of the great divide in medical education as I begin to shed the “student” label and take the first steps to becoming the clinician that I have obsessively worked for since my white coat ceremony. With each passing interview I am becoming increasingly frightened and invigorated about the prospect of becoming an intern.

This question of what I am seeking in residency invariably catches me off guard.
Read More

Jul242015

Mistakes Made, Lessons Learned in the ED

Jackie Hirsch, MSIII Leave a Comment Med Student Blog Tags: ,

In reflecting on my wonderfully addicting four-week stint in the NYU/Bellevue Emergency department, I began to wonder what advice I would have given myself before showing up to work that first day, knowing what I know now. What would I be more mindful of? What mistakes would I avoid repeating? This is how I came up with a list of 4 lessons I learned and the mistakes I made. I share these anecdotes with the hope that medical students may learn from my experiences, and that residents may be reminded of the awkward and brand new experiences medical students run into in the ED.

Lesson 1. Pay attention to the little things.

As a medical student, we often feel completely lost and inadequate, but we have one thing that the doctors don’t have—TIME! TAKE YOUR TIME.  Pay attention to the little things that the busy residents and nurses might miss. 
Read More