Core Content edited by Reuben Strayer, MD

Journal Review

NEXUS Chest Decision Instruments

Filed Under: Tags: , , January 28th, 2016 Leave a Comment

CT use in the evaluation of trauma patients has risen dramatically in recent years. “Pan-scan” (CT scan from head through pelvis) is used routinely in many trauma centers in spite of the American College of Surgeons inclusion of avoidance of routine whole body CT in trauma in it’s Choosing Wisely recommendations. Although prior studies have demonstrated increased identification of traumatic pathology with “pan-scanning” there has not been a concurrent demonstration of decreased morbidity or mortality.
Read More

Journal Review

The Predictive Ability of the FAST Examination in Traumatic Cardiac Arrest

Filed Under: Tags: , , , December 31st, 2015 One Comment

Resuscitative thoracotomy (RT) performed in the Emergency Department (ED) is a potentially life-saving procedure in patients with traumatic cardiac arrest. However, the procedure does have the potential to harm providers (i.e. fluid exposure). Therefore, it is important to weight two different perspectives: the patient is dead and will remain so if an RT is not performed so why not try it as a last ditch effort and that RT is low yield so why expend resources and create a potential risk of harm to providers. 
Read More

Core

Compartment Syndrome

Filed Under: Leave a Comment

Compartment syndrome is a limb and life threatening disease where rapid recognition, diagnosis and aggressive management is critical.
Read More

Core

Procedural Sedation and Analgesia Resources

Filed Under: Tags: Leave a Comment

This post reviews the concepts of procedural sedation + highlights resources from emupdates.com (PSA checklist + screencast trilogy)
Read More

Reuben Strayer, MD

Reuben Strayer, MD

Associate Editor - Trauma

Reuben Strayer was born on the shores of Lake Michigan but raised and schooled in Texas until emigrating to balmy Montreal for a residency in emergency medicine. Having finished his training equipped with more confidence than knowledge, he accepted a faculty position at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City where he spent equal time rescuing health from the hands of disease and attending committee meetings. These days, he can usually be found working an evening or overnight shift in a Sinai or NYU-affiliated emergency department. His clinical areas of interest include airway management, procedural sedation, decision-making, and error. His extra-clinical areas of interest include sweeping generalizations and jalapeño peppers.